Dom's Big Fat Walk To Work


In May 2018 Dominic Dover-McCarthy walked 120 miles from Cambridge to Horsham. A self-described 'big old unit who loves pies and does absolutely no physical exercise whatsoever', it wasn't an easy journey by any stretch of the imagination.

In Dom's Big Fat Walk To Work, you can read about why he did it, and join him on the journey as he strode, staggered and stumbled all the way from Cambridgeshire to West Sussex.

Dom's Big Fat Walk To Work


In May 2018 Dominic Dover-McCarthy walked 120 miles from Cambridge to Horsham. A self-described 'big old unit who loves pies and does absolutely no physical exercise whatsoever', it wasn't an easy journey by any stretch of the imagination.

In Dom's Big Fat Walk To Work, you can read about why he did it, and join him on the journey as he strode, staggered and stumbled all the way from Cambridgeshire to West Sussex.

An entertaining and charming read.
David Burnley
A wonderful story of one man finding out what's possible
Petra Wilkinson
Poignant and engaging
S. F. Johnson
Prologue
A DAFT IDEA
Throughout history, there have been many daft ideas.

I’m not talking about every day errors in judgement, such as ‘that traffic cone is going to make a great hat’, or ‘sure I’ll have another, the job interview doesn’t start until 11am’. I’m talking about ideas which have a sort of resonance that grants them their own capital letters: ‘A Daft Idea’.

Daft Ideas of course have been around since the dawn of time, and the emergence of mankind. I’m happy to use the description mankind, as generally in my experience it’s men who have the Daft Ideas which in many cases are no better executed than they are workable to start with. When King Canute decided to hold back the sea with nothing but a sword and royal impertinence, I have no doubt that Mrs Canute was at home, sighing and shrugging and saying ‘Well, he just won’t be told’.

Other Daft Ideas have their foundations in great aspirations. John F. Kennedy boldly pledged in 1962 to ‘fly a man to the moon and return him to the Earth’. This was achieved (or not, depending which Internet you frequent) in 1969, but then we got cocky in 1971 and decided to take the Lunar Roving Vehicle with us. Whilst there were robust scientific reasons to do so, this whole endeavour could be described as ‘Hey let’s fly to the moon and drive around for a bit’, which generously could be framed as A Daft Idea by any measure available.

Other Daft Ideas include the Sinclair C5, filling airships with hydrogen, and of course Robin Thicke’s album ‘Paula’ (which was almost as catastrophic as the airship thing). Sometimes bad ideas are fairly simple ideas that just run away with themselves. In the middle of the 1800s, for example, Thomas Austin asked his brother to send 24 rabbits to Australia, just so he’d have something to hunt. After they were innocently released, they bred like, well like rabbits to be honest, and by 1940 there were over 800 million rabbits across the continent. Every single rabbit in Australia can be traced back to these 24 rabbits; a greater example of ‘things getting a little out of hand’ you’ll not find.

Still not quite as awful as the Robin Thicke thing though.

It’s in our nature to invent, to plan, to imagine. And therefore I don’t see an end to the amount of Daft Ideas that masquerade as human endeavour. There’s probably a book somewhere on Amazon that lists an entertaining and horrifying collection of Daft Ideas throughout history. If it doesn’t exist, then I’ll happily compile it.

But first, I need to write this book.

Which shares the story of my very own Daft Idea
Chapter 18
LONDON BABY
I strode more slowly now into the centre of the bridge, and all of a sudden, and without warning, the tears came again. It was a hugely emotive moment for me. Whilst I’d passed the half way mark in terms of miles without incident a number of hours ago, this felt like the emotional half way point. A very definite sense of crossing from the North to the South. Essentially it felt like I was now on my way home and –

‘Gee, hey, are you alriiiight, sir?’

I looked up in the concerned face of an American tourist, who was standing next to his – not to put too fine a point on it – enormous children, and who’s worried face showed a genuine concern.

‘Ah, hi yes. I’m fine. I’m... I’m just having a bit of an emotional day, that’s all’.

‘Is there anyone I can call? Anything I can do?’

‘No, no it’s fine. I’ve just... Um...’

My words trailed away as I once again hit the same wall I’d done previously. I was never sure how to explain quickly and efficiently what I was doing. I was always keen not to say too much and risk sounding boastful, but also understood the need to steady people’s concern when they saw me standing by the roadside in tears. ‘I’m doing a very long walk, for charity. And this is the half way point. I’ve walked here from Cambridge’, I explained, not expecting him to know where Cambridge even was.

‘Gee, that’s like fifty miles away at least’, he replied, surprisingly me a little. ‘And you’ve walked here this morning. That’s incredible’.

Oh lordy, I thought. He thinks I’ve done it today, all in one hit. ‘Um, no. I started on Monday and – ‘

‘Oh okay’, he replied looking a little bit deflated. ‘But that’s alright. That’s good too I suppose’.

Yes. Yes it is.

‘Daaaaaaad I’m bored’, said one of the enormous children, rolling his eyes at me. ‘Can we goooooooo?’

Daaaaaaaaaad looked at me with a gee-shucks expression, reached out and pumped my hand furiously. ‘Good luck with the walk, and the camping. Hope you’re not too uncomfortable in the tent’.

‘Well, I... erm... ‘

But with that they were gone, leaving me a little deflated that not only had I taken three days to get this far, but I wasn’t even camping. Lazy, clearly.

But I didn’t care that much. I was South of the river and I was on my way home.

See the journey for yourself
THE VIDEO DAIRY
Dom was keen to record his journey as he walked back from Cambridge, so also filmed his Big Fat Walk To Work. From the interview at BBC Radio Cambridge on the morning of his departure, all the way through to him rounding the last corner.

One man in ridiculous sunglasses with selfie-stick and a whole lot of raisins, click on the video to see more.
Buy the book
AVAILABLE FOR PRE-ORDER NOW
The first print run of Dom's Big Fat Walk To Work will be released in paperback in September 2019 viaTotal Therapy Studios in Horsham, UK.

A Kindle / eBook edition is not planned at this time, so why not treat yourself by pre-ordering a copy of the paperback today?

Dom's Big Fat Walk To Work is available for pre-order at just £9.99 + shipping, so click below to reserve your copy.


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